Crisis over

It’s appropriate that I concluded writing about Crisis in the week Thatcher died. Her presence was all over Crisis; she appeared as Gloria Monday in Dan Dare, she appeared as herself with her emasculated late Cabinet in True Faith, she appeared symbolically in a panel of The New Adventures of Hitler when John Bull was … Continue reading

Rather break things

Rereading Skin by Brendan McCarthy and Peter Milligan. Censorship in a free society isn’t monolithic. It isn’t the state, a grey bureaucrat in Central Office, who stamps transgressive art as unworthy of mass consumption. The process is instead gradual, the work of many hands each with an individual standard of what society can endure. Free … Continue reading

Preach to the yout’ dem

Rereading Third World War by Pat Mills, Malachy Coney, Alan Mitchell and various artists. Like a Detective Comics reader ignoring Batman, like a 2000AD reader never mentioning Judge Dredd, I’ve written about all kinds of stuff that appeared in Crisis but never mentioned its tentpole franchise. Third World War, written by Pat Mills and others … Continue reading

Crisis of identity

I haven’t written about everything that appeared in Crisis. When I write about Third World War I’ll probably have covered more than half the stuff that appeared in its pages, because Third World War was close to half of what appeared in its pages. I wrote about New Statesmen in an early series of blogs … Continue reading

Going nowhere, connecting with nothing

Rereading Bible John: A Forensic Meditation by Grant Morrison and Daniel Vallely. Being honest: I never believed there was an actual living rivalry between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison before the latter’s freakout at the end of last year. I mean people have always talked about it, or they have since comics fans found each … Continue reading

A lovespoke in the grim wheel

Rereading Rogan Gosh by Brendan McCarthy and Peter Milligan. If all art aspires to the condition of music then comics get closer than most. The cognitive and aesthetic senses are engaged simultaneously, the mind swept along with story and empathy while the eye delights in beauty. In theory. I mean, presumably nobody’s thinking that when … Continue reading

Makes everything seem so miserable

Rereading Dare: The Future by Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes. How many years will it take for historians to produce an objective, sober assessment of what Margaret Thatcher did to Britain? How many decades? 22 years haven’t been enough. Her legacy, using that word neutrally, is as passionately disputed now as it was when she … Continue reading

I hated you first

Rereading Insiders by Mark Millar and Paul Grist.  So what about if it happens the other way? What’s the result when a writer who wants nothing more than to write Superman and Wolverine and Judge Dredd has to write socially relevant stuff about the real world, instead of the reverse? You get Mark Millar and … Continue reading

Opal Fruits, Milky Bars, toy soldiers

Rereading Still Life by John Smith and Sean Phillips. I got a couple of new graphic novels for Christmas, which might be a surprise to readers of this blog to whom I’m a fanboy Amish who refuses to admit the existence of anything published after 1995. I’ve spent half the last month reading Brandon Graham’s … Continue reading

Looking through James Herbert books just for the bits with sex in

Rereading Straitgate by John Smith and Sean Phillips. We say a piece of art hits home, or when that’s worn out from overuse we say that it hits us where we live. By which we mean that it feels personal, as if the artist has created it just for us, that they’ve identified a singular … Continue reading